Book Lovers Recommendations January 2020

Recommendations by Susan Lipstein
 
Before She Was Found by Heather Gudenkauf
The Chelsea Girls By Fiona Davis
The Confession Club By Elizabeth Berg
Funny Man Mel Brooks By Patrick McGilligan
How to Treat People: a Nurse
The Library of Lost and Found By Phaedra Patrick
The Nanny By Gilly Macmillan
The Peanuts Papers By Andres Blauner, editor
The Pioneers By David McCullough
Tomorrow There Will be Sun By Dana Reinhardt
 
Before She Was Found
By Heather Gudenkauf
Three twelve year old girls sneak out to go to an abandoned rail yard during a sleepover.  Later that night, one is found bloody and beaten and two are missing.  The main characters tell the story in their own voices-and it is a story of young girls, abuse of social media, bullying and mental illness. 
 
The Chelsea Girls
By Fiona Davis
Twenty years of friendship between two women during the 1940’s to 1960’s.  Playwright Hazel and actress Maxine have big dreams.  They want to put a play on Broadway, not such an easy task for two women at that time.  Their dream is complicated by the rise of McCarthyism.  This is a story of how fear drives us apart and art brings us together.
 
The Confession Club
By Elizabeth Berg
A group of women decide to meet weekly and use their time to talk about their innermost secrets in a safe place which they call “the confession club.”  Two new members add spice to the group.  The ladies find out about the power and peril of having close, personal friends.
 
Funny Man Mel Brooks
By Patrick McGilligan
Mel Brooks has written millions of words over his career, but never an autobiography.  So McGilligan has written the story of his life, which is as much about what Brooks learned from his successes as well as what he has learned from his flops.  The story of his perseverance makes interesting reading.
 
How to Treat People: a Nurse’s Notes
By Molly Case
A cardiac nurse specialist in England writes about her career.  Her experiences as a child needing surgery fueled her desire to make a career out of helping others.  She modeled her nursing after the people she watched who handle not just the medical needs of their patients, but their emotional needs as well.
 
The Library of Lost and Found
By Phaedra Patrick
Martha has spent her life taking care of others.  One day she is given a book with an inscription from her grandmother-an inscription written mysteriously after the death date of her grandmother.  Martha sets off on a search to find out the truth about her grandmother, which uncovers the truth about her own life.  Can she use what she has learned to change her life for the better?
 
The Nanny
By Gilly Macmillan
Seven year old Jocelyn is devastated when her beloved nanny abruptly disappears from her English manor house. Years later, Jocelyn returns to England, as does her nanny.  Now Jocelyn has to deal with the sins of the past in order to move into the future.
 
The Peanuts Papers
By Andres Blauner, editor
This thoughtful book is subtitled “writers and cartoonists on Charlie Brown, Snoopy & the Gang, and the Meaning of Life.”  33 artists and writers reflect on the deeper truths of a comic that is deceptively simple. 
 
The Pioneers
By David McCullough
McCullough, a Pulitzer Prize winning historian, tells the true story of the pioneers who settled in the northwest territory after Britain ceded the land to the newly born United States.  Drawn to move because of the promise of freedom of religion, a free education and no slavery, the settlers start out in 1788 to settle what will become Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin.  A fascinating read.
 
Tomorrow There Will be Sun
By Dana Reinhardt
When a woman plans her husband’s 50th birthday celebration in Mexico, what could go wrong?  Just about everything.  Her seemingly perfect life falls apart, but does she have the inner strength to make sure to carry on?

New Test Practice Database

Mometrix eLibrary

We have a new database, Mometrix, that allows our patrons to prep and practice for a variety of tests, including GED, GRE, Praxis, ACT, SAT, and many more!

Mometrix can be accessed at any time from our Research Databases list, under the subject “Education & Scholarship”. In order to access the database, choose your home library from the list, and on the next screen when it asks for your “password” enter your library barcode number (located on the back of your card, beneath the barcode). You can then choose “Practice Tests” from the left-hand menu to view all available tests. 

F.M. Kirby Gallery Exhibit Maya Tillman: Woman – Her Story

Exhibit Opening: January 11th 2020. Reception January 23rd 2020. Exhibit closing February 28th, 2020.

Maya Tillman is a 22 year old artist from Morris County. Originally from Atlanta, Georgia, she currently attends Mason Gross School of Art at Rutgers University, Her major areas of focus are media studies and graphic design. For the past two years her ongoing research has been focused on understanding and creating enlightenment around the female psyche (mind, body and soul) and how it is affected by society. This exhibit presents her evolving level of appreciation for the WOMAN. She invites you to sojourn with her on this exploration of empowerment and liberation.

Exhibition runs January 11th-February 28th. There will be a reception on January 23rd.

Access Consumer Reports Online

We’re pleased to announce our patrons now have access to Consumer Reports online! Anyone familiar with the magazines will find all they’re familiar with and more on the web-based version of Consumer Reports. Looking for a new fridge, car, humidifier, or mattress?  You can find ratings, specifications, articles, and more to help guide you through the decision making process on Consumer Reports online. You can access it on our website through our Recommended Websites page or our Research Databases page, or by clicking here.

If accessing from home, you will need your Morristown & Morris Township Library card to login. 

Book Lovers Recommendations December 2019

Recommendations by Susan Lipstein
 
Before and After: The Incredible Real-life Stories of Orphans Who Survived the Tennessee Children
The Body: A Guide for All Occupants by Bill Bryson
The Button Man by Andrew Gross
City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert
Daughter of Moloka
Girls Like Us by Cristina Alger
Olive, Again by Elizabeth Strout
The Wives by Tarryn Fisher
The World We  Knew by Alice Hoffman
 
Before and After: The Incredible Real-life Stories of Orphans Who Survived the Tennessee Children’s Home Society by Judy Christie and Lisa Wingate
After author Lisa Wingate published her novel “Before We Were Yours,” which was a fictionalized account of a family broken apart by the unscrupulous dealings of Georgia Tann of the Tennessee Children’s Home Society, she started to hear from adults who were adopted through the corrupt agency.  She asked her writer friend, Judy Christie, to help her follow up on their stories, and the result is this poignant book-proving again that truth can be stranger-and even sadder- than fiction.
 
The Body: A Guide for All Occupants by Bill Bryson
One thing you can say about this 450 page book is that it is comprehensive.  And it is also readable and very, very funny.  Only Bill Bryson can take you on a tour of the human body, from top to bottom, and include anatomy, physiology, evolution, health and illness, and have it be instructive and enjoyable. 
 
The Button Man by Andrew Gross
This is an historical thriller-3 Jewish brothers raised in the Lower East Side in the early  1900’s make different life choices as they grow up.  One enters the garment industry, one goes onto college, and one gets involved with mobsters and gang violence.  Including real historical events and characters adds credibility to this story.
 
City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert
The novel is told by a woman in her 80’s who looks back on her life, starting with her arrival in New York City in 1940 when she was 19 and started working in the theater district.  Her life defied the conventions of her time and she struggles to realize her own identity in an era when it was nearly impossible for women to stand on their own.
 
Daughter of Moloka’i by Alan Brennert
This is a sequel to Brennert’s novel, “Moloaka’i,” published in 2003, which was the fictionalized account of life in a leper colony which actually existed on one of the Hawaiian Islands.  One of the characters in the first novel, Rachel, who had leprosy, married a Japanes man in the leper colony and gave birth to a healthy daughter, Ruth, whom she had to release for adoption.  This is the story of her Ruth and Rachel.  It can be read as a stand-alone novel.
Girls Like Us by Cristina Alger
Nell, an FBI agent, comes home after 10 years away to close out the estate of her estranged father, who had been a homicide detective.  When one of his old partners asks Nell to help him investigate two recent murders, Nell finds that not only does all evidence point to her father as a prime suspect, but  also he might possibly have had  a role in her mother’s murder which happened when Nell was only seven years old.
 
Olive, Again by Elizabeth Strout
Olive Kitteridge is back-still unflinchingly honest-and she is moving along in her life as she heads into her 70’s and 80’s. She is moving on after the loss of her husband, Henry, and even marries again.  And maybe, just maybe, she has become, as she says in her own words, “a little bit better person.”  Strout continues to create memorable characters.
 
Strung Out – A Memoir by Erin Khar
To be published in February 2020
Khar grew up in Los Angeles and started using heroin when she was only 13.  For the next 15 years, drugs shaped her life.  She writes sensitively, showing how both the stigma of addiction and  shame kept her from getting help.  Only when she faced motherhood did she find the strength to fight her demons.
 
The Wives by Tarryn Fisher
The main character is this book is married to a man that she knows is also married to other women.  She sees him only once a week and is satisfied in this relationship until she finds the name of a woman whom she surmises is one of his other wives in his belongings.  Curious, she finds out that he is abusing this woman-and the novel only gets stranger from there. It is a psychological suspense story with lots of twists and turns.
 
The World We  Knew by Alice Hoffman
Hanni, the mother of 12 year old Lea, wants to keep her daughter safe by any means from the evils of Germany in the 1940’s.  Hoffman, who is known for her unique style of “magical realism” uses this to tell the story of how Lea is given a mythical figure, a golem, to protect her, and the story becomes a tale of love in the face of evil. 

Christmas & New Years Hours

The library will be closed December 24th & 25th, and reopen on December 26th.

We will also close early on December 31st, at 3PM, and remain closed through January 1st, reopening with regular hours on January 2nd.

Book Lovers Recommendations November 2019

Recommendations by Susan Lipstein
 
All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung
A Better Man by Louise Penny
The Cactus by Sarah Haywood
The Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall
A False Report: A True Story of Rape in America by T. Christian Miller and Ken Armstrong
Heaven, My Home by Attica Locke
The Most Fun We Ever Had by Claire Lombardo
Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner
Never Have I Ever by Joshilyn Jackson
Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson
 
All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung
Nicole Chung wrote this memoir about her struggle for her own identity.  She was born to Korean parents who had come to the US but released her for adoption as they felt they couldn’t take care of Nicole due to her medical needs.  Adopted by white parents and raised in a small town in Oregon, she never met another Asian child until she was 18, and never told her parents about her struggles with racism and self-identity.  She connected to her biological family when she was pregnant with her first child and her story is a poignant struggle to make peace with herself and her family.
 
A Better Man by Louise Penny
Inspector Gamache is back.  He is now sharing a job with his son-in-law, and, as if that were not difficult enough, he is asked to take on a case that tears at his heartstrings-a man’s daughter is missing and he specifically asks Gamache to help him find her.  This only complicates Gamache’s personal and professional life.
 
The Cactus by Sarah Haywood
A debut novel by an English author.  Susan is 45 years old and content with her very controlled life-until she finds that her mother has left the family home to Susan’s ne’er do well brother; at the same time, Susan finds out she is pregnant, with a child she very much wishes to have.  It’s a real delight to watch Susan, the prickly cactus, discover and deal with unexpected life changes and surprising chances to open herself to love.
 
The Dearly Beloved by Cara Wall
Decades of love, friendship and struggles are revealed in this novel about two very different couples whom we follow from the 1950’s into the modern age.  Each husband and wife face challenges in their personal lives as well as the work lives that the husbands share.
 
A False Report: A True Story of Rape in America by T. Christian Miller and Ken Armstrong
The two authors won a Pulitzer Prize in 2016 for their article about a young woman whose report of a rape is not only not taken seriously, but results in her being charged with false reporting.  The article grew into a book which then grew into the Neflix limited TV series, “Unbelieveable,” which follows the case once two female detectives discover that the woman’s story is true and a serial rapist has been allowed to strike over and over again.
 
Heaven, My Home by Attica Locke
African American Texas Ranger Darren Matthews has been assigned to investigate the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas.  Because of this assignment, he is sent to work with a white local sheriff in a small town in Texas where the young son of an imprisoned white supremacist has been reported missing.  The novel deals with a story about crimes, both old and new, in a time of political and racial tension.  It’s a modern mystery reflecting our complicated times.
 
The Most Fun We Ever Had by Claire Lombardo
The novel deals with 3 generations of a family.  The four daughters tell their stories-their whole lives they have been trying to find the happiness that they believe their parents have found in their relationship.  Everyone’s lives turn up-side down when the son who was given up at birth by one of the daughters returns  to assert his place in the family.
 
Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner
This popular author starts with two characters who seem to be based on two familiar sisters in the beloved novel “Little Women,” Jo and Beth,  But Weiner switches the personalities around and takes them on a surprising journey of 70 years.  Difficult subjects such as abortion, rape and racism are dealt with as well.
 
Never Have I Ever by Joshilyn Jackson
Amy is living a wonderful life; she is married to a devoted husband with a beautiful baby, with a step-daughter who even likes her.  Into this mix comes a new neighbor who seems to know an awful lot about the secrets that the women in Amy’s up-scale neighborhood would like to keep under wraps-including secrets about Amy that she wants kept quiet.  The book is “diabolically entertaining.”
 
Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson
Four characters in one African American  family tell their story.  In 2001, 16 year old Melody.  is being ushered into adulthood at a lavish party hosted by her wealthy grand-parents who, along with her father, raised her when her mother, pregnant at 16, left the  child with them to pursue her own independent life. 

Our New Site

a laptop showing HTML code

Welcome to our new website!

With recent changes in website software construction and the need for better connectivity with mobile devices, we decided that an effort to improve and redesign our site was in order. Our new look included everything we’ve had before, and more! Our Research Databases, Resources, and Recommended websites are now browseable by subject, and searchable by keyword. Our Book Blog has gotten a makeover, and a sibling page called “Book Lists” in order to bring you MORE exciting book news more often!

Our new website will also allow you to browse more easily on a variety of devices, all the way from a phone or tablet to your desktop. There is also now a site-wide search function, which you can find at the top right of the site. This search has two tabs, the default is set to “Search our Catalog” and the secondary tab allows you to search directly on the website. This can be helpful if you’re not sure where to find your favorite resource from our old website, or just to explore what we have on our new website!

If you cannot find something, please feel free to give us a call at 973-538-2592 or send us a comment in the form below. We hope you enjoy our new look!

Book Lovers Recommendations October 2019

Recommendations by Susan Lipstein
 
Dominicana by Angie Cruz
Home for Erring and Outcast Girls by Julie Kibler
Knife by Jo Nesbo
Lake of the Ozarks by Bill Geist
Live a Little by Howard Jacobson
The Perfect Child by Lucinda Berry
Things You Save in A Fire by Katherine Center
Tidelands by Phillipa Gregory
The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware
The Whisper Man by Alex North
 
Dominicana by Angie Cruz
The author has based her story on the life of her mother.  In 1965, 15 year old Ana marries a man nearly twice her age and moves from the Dominican Republic to New York City.  She is not in love with her husband, Juan, but her marriage will make it possible for her family to move to America.  She finds herself trapped with a controlling husband.  When he has to return to the Dominican Republic on business, she finds herself with freedom-free to go to Coney Island, free to take English lessons, and free to maybe fall in love with Juan’s younger brother, Cesar.
 
Home for Erring and Outcast Girls by Julie Kibler
This novel combines an historical story with a contemporary one.  Told in alternating chapters, the novel goes back and forth between the research being done by a reclusive university librarian and her intern, and two women who forged an unlikely friendship based on adversity in the “Home” in Texas. 
 
Knife by Jo Nesbo
The fictional Harry Hole is back and he just can’t catch a break.  Drinking too much, he it thrown out of his house by his wife, but when she is murdered, Harry blames a criminal, a serial murderer, whom he put in jail and who has now been released. It’s a well constructed mystery with lots of twists and turns.
 
Lake of the Ozarks by Bill Geist
Mid-western families in the 1960’s loved to vacation at Lake of the Ozarks, and Bill Geist spent many a summer at a small resort owned by his uncle.  Looking back on his life as a successful writer, humorist and award winning correspondent for CBS Sunday morning, he believes that the time spent there made him into the person he has become.  It’s a fun read, and you will laugh out loud.
 
Live a Little by Howard Jacobson
This is the “late in life” story of two senior citizens who find meaning in each other even as they confront their own fears about the future-and the past.  Beryl has had a full and active life and now is facing memory loss.  Shimi’s memory is too good-he is still trying to deal with traumas from his past.  The two strike up an unlikely friendship that brings happiness in surprising ways. 
 
The Perfect Child by Lucinda Berry
A happily married couple who cannot conceive a child foster a child who has been abused.  From the start, her behavior is appallingly difficult, but she behaves well with the husband, who persuades his wife to formally adopt her.  The story is told from the point of view of the husband, wife and their dedicated social worker.  It’s well written, and comes with a few big surprises.
 
Things You Save in A Fire by Katherine Center
Cassie is a female fire fighter in Texas who relocates to Boston to help care for her ailing mother.  The Boston fire house is more backwards than the one she left in Texas-there is more hazing of her because she is a woman and the firehouse lacks proper funding-but there is a very attractive rookie.  Center is good at creating characters, and she writes well about strong women who must deal with adversity-and find love as well.
 
Tidelands by Phillipa Gregory
Usually Gregory writes about royalty, but in this novel, she turns to an ordinary woman living in the 1640’s in England.  Bright, strong-willed, trying to survive -rumored to be a witch-Alinor has not been dealt an easy hand.  This is the first entry in what is planned to be a multi-generational, multi-volume saga about a family that starts out in rags-and survives.
 
The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware
The suspense novel starts out with Rowan Caine, a young woman who has been hired to be a live-in nanny in a house located in an isolated Scottish town, writing a letter to a lawyer to help her as she has been charged with murdering one of the children in her care.  Rowan’s dream job turns into a nightmare-but there are enough twists and turns to keep the reader happy as she tells her tale. 
 
The Whisper Man by Alex North
A young boy in a small English town has been abducted under the same circumstances as five other people who were abducted and killed 20 years ago.  But that killer is safely in jail.  One of the people who investigated the first murders is assigned the case, and he must work fast, as the next victim looks like it might be the young son of a widowed man who has just moved into town.