New Library App!

We are excited to announce a new Mobile app, so you can bring the Library with you in your pocket! 

Our consortium, Morris Automated Information Network (MAIN) has been hard at work with SOLUS to create this dynamic app that delivers advanced functionality, and gives patrons easy access to the diverse shared collection of resources in our consortium. The app also includes a digital library card with linkable accounts, downloadable electronic resources, full-catalog searching with the ability to place holds, multi-language support, curbside pickup, self-check-out and more.

This is the icon you’re looking for

You can download the app from the Apple and Google Play App stores by searching “MAIN Libraries.”

Once downloaded, the app will guide users through a one-time login, then take them directly to their local library environment from that point on.

 

Adult Summer Reading 2021

From July 6th – September 6th

 

Join us for Adult Summer Reading fun! For every book you read, or program of ours that you attend, you can fill out a raffle ticket for a weekly chance to win a Grab Bag of Books, AND the chance to win our grand prize at the end of the summer: a gift certificate to a local business. 

There are two steps to participate:

  1. Sign up for our Summer Reading
  2. Fill out a raffle ticket anytime you finish a book or attend a program
  3. Profit!

Sorry, that’s three steps.

You can sign up in-library by visiting our Circulation or Reader’s Advisory desks and a staff member will help you sign up. To fill out the raffle tickets in-library, visit our Circulation room, where the tickets will be on a display table near the doors onto South Street.

If you prefer not to come in, you can also participate remotely! Use this google form, which both signs you up for Summer Reading and functions as a raffle ticket — fill it in whenever you complete a book (audiobooks count too!) or attend one of our programs (Zoom programs count too!)

Happy reading!

 

We also have Summer Reading Programs for Kids and Teens.

Current Services: Updated 6/7/21

HOURS

Mon.–Thur., 11:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Sat., 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. (Jul/Aug – 10 a.m.-2 p.m.)
Sunday 1-5 p.m.

 

  • Patrons are asked to limit their time in the Library to 45 minutes per day. 
  • There will be no access to individual study rooms or the lower level meeting room at this time. 
  • Please utilize hand sanitizing stations when entering and leaving the building and practice social distancing while on Library property. 
  • Returned collection items should go into the Library’s book drops and should not be returned to staff or public desks.  
  • A limited number of public computers will be available for use. 
  • Wi-Fi is available throughout the building and on the Library grounds and parking lot. 
  • Wireless printing is also available to be picked up curbside or in person through the PrinterON App or website.  For more information see the Library website or contact the Reference Department at (973) 538-2592.
  • The North Jersey History & Genealogy Center will be open by appointment only. Patrons interested in utilizing NJHGC materials should call (973) 538-3473 or e-mail njhgc@jfpl.orgto set up an appointment.
  • Curbside Pick-up will continue to be offered as an option for patrons, you can view information on Curbside pick-up here
  • Fines resumed as of January 15th, 2021.   
  • Our Library of Things is once again available!

 

 

PressReader is Here!

Our county consortium, MAIN, has switched from RBDigital to an app called PressReader.

PressReader provides unlimited access to over 7,000 of the world’s top newspapers and magazines! These titles include The Guardian, Bloomberg Businessweek, Los Angeles Times, Daily Mail, L’Équipe, Der Tagesspiegel, Libération, and many more. The app also allows you to translate articles into 18 different languages, so you can read international news and magazines in your native language.

You can access by downloading the app to your preferred device through this link or by using your devices’ App or Play store. Our patrons can now sign into PressReader using their library card number and PIN, and check out what they have to offer!

You can also check out PressReader’s how-to video playlist and get to know them a bit!

Let us know what you think about PressReader by connecting with us on social media, email, or giving us a call to share your impressions. Your feedback is important as MAIN decides whether or not to continue using PressReader in 2022, and we will pass on your thoughts to them.

 

Fines Resume January 15th

Dear patrons,

The board of MAIN, our consortium of libraries in greater Morris County that administers our online catalog, has decided to allow fines to begin to accrue on items checked out and now past due.  Thus, beginning January 15, 2021, the Morristown & Morris Township Library will resume collecting fines on our items. Our staff will begin to again accept cash and checks as methods of payment for future fines.  Please note that some MAIN libraries began accruing fines on their items as of January 1, 2021, so any items checked out from other libraries may accrue fines for items due since that time.  For any Morristown & Morris Township Library items, patrons will not be charged before January 15. If you have any questions or concerns about your account or your items, please contact our staff at the main Circulation desk at 973-538-6161 or via email at circ-mmt@mainlib.org.

Our online catalog system will be down from January 8-12 in order to bring the records of  two new MAIN members, Bernardsville Library and the Hunterdon County Library system, into our system.  The addition of these two new members will provide additional resources for patrons to borrow and utilize.  The Bernardsville Library has been our partner in borrowing for years through the Morris-Union Federation (MUF) and more recently MAIN has shared costs with the Hunterdon County Library in acquiring online databases.  For more information on these new MAIN libraries, please see: https://www.mainlib.org/press/

Thank you for your continued support of our library!

 

Best,

The Morristown & Morris Township Library Staff

Coming soon: PressReader

Our county consortium, MAIN, is switching from RBDigital to an app called PressReader in January.

PressReader provides unlimited access to over 7,000 of the world’s top newspapers and magazines! These titles include The Guardian, Bloomberg Businessweek, Los Angeles Times, Daily Mail, L’Équipe, Der Tagesspiegel, Libération, and many more. The app also allows you to translate articles into 18 different languages, so you can read international news and magazines in your native language.

You can prepare for access by downloading the app to your preferred device through this link or by using your devices’ App or Play store. On January 1st, our patrons will be able to sign into PressReader using their library card number and PIN, and check out what they have to offer!

In the meantime, you can also check out PressReader’s how-to video playlist and get to know them a bit!

Let us know what you think about PressReader by connecting with us on social media, email, or giving us a call to share your impressions. Your feedback is important as MAIN decides whether or not to continue using PressReader in 2022, and we will pass on your thoughts to them.

 

Book Lovers Recommendations December 2020 Part II

Recommendations by Sue Lipstein
 
All The Young Men By Ruth Coker Burks
Arctic Fury By Greer Macallister
Chicken Sisters By K.J. Dell
Dancing in the Mosque: an Afghan Mother
Loved and Wanted: A Memoir of Choice, Children and Womanhood By Christa Parravani
Moonflower Murders By Anthony Horowitz
Old Filth By Jane Gardam
Thirty Names of Night By Zeyn Joukhadar
Where I Come From By Rick Bragg
Wicked Hour: A Natalie Lockhart Novel By Alice Blanchard
 
All The Young Men
By Ruth Coker Burks
 
This is the memoir of Ruth, who, in 1986, visited a friend in the hospital and watched how an AIDs patient was being shunned.  When she bravely went to comfort him, word spread that she was willing to care for AIDs patients and she became an early advocate for AIDS patients during a time of misinformation and discrimination.  She became an advisor to then Governor Bill Clinton who looked to her for advice in handling the AIDS/HIV crisis.  An important story.
 
 
Arctic Fury
By Greer Macallister
 
This fictional novel is based on historical events.  It is 1855 and four attempts to locate ships lost in an Arctic expedition have failed.  Now the wife of the lost leader asks Virginia to lead an all female expedition to find her husband.  A year later, Virginia is on trial for the murder of one of the members of her expedition.  What really happened?  A tale of murder and intrigue.
 
 
Chicken Sisters
By K.J. Dell’Antonia
 
This is a debut novel.  Two rival fried chicken joints in a small Kansas town are owned by feuding family members.  A reality TV show called Food Wars decides to pit them against each other.  Long held secrets between the families start to come out.  The author’s fond memories of her childhood in a small  Texas town help the story to ring true.
 
 
Dancing in the Mosque: an Afghan Mother’s Letter to Her Son
By Homeira Qaderi
 
Qaderi gave birth to her son in the middle of the Afghanistan conflict.  But she was not an ordinary Afghani woman-she was an activist, who risked her life to teach women in her country.  In 2015, right before she was to leave for an international conference, her husband suddenly divorced her and because of the laws in her country, she immediately lost custody of her young son and was forced to leave him behind.  This is her love letter to him.  
 
 
Loved and Wanted: A Memoir of Choice, Children and Womanhood
By Christa Parravani
 
Parravani had an abortion at age 20.  She went on to get married, have two children and struggle with her husband to provide for them financially.  At age 40, she had an unplanned pregnancy and had to make some difficult choices that were made even harder because in her home state of West Virginia in 2017, it was not easy to get an abortion. Although she feared that having this child would end her career, she ultimately chose to give birth.  She writes eloquently of the difficulties of women who choose this path, and have to struggle with being underpaid and having to deal with our healthcare system.
 
 
Moonflower Murders
By Anthony Horowitz
 
This is sort of a sequel to “Magpie Murders.”  The editor of the late mystery writer,  Alan Conway, Susan Ryeland, both of whom played a part in “Magpie Murders,” is roped  into a murder investigation which leads her back into looking for clues in her late client’s book.  Horowitz is a master of mysteries within mysteries and his books are great fun.
 
 
Old Filth
By Jane Gardam
 
Gardam is an award winning English author, and although this book was published in 2004, I only just discovered it. Old Filth is a retired judge, living a quiet and boring life in a small English village, having retired from living in Hong Kong.  The author takes us back into his past so we discover what has made him what he is-and she has a wonderful writing style-she is a master of language and subtle plot creation.  This is the first volume of a trilogy.
 
 
Thirty Names of Night
By Zeyn Joukhadar
 
This novel spans three generation of  Syrian Americans.  A young trans boy, who has never felt like he belongs, finds the journal of a Syrian American artist who had disappeared 60 years before.  He finds that her past is tied to his mother’s and grandmother’s past, and discovers the history of queer and transgender people in his community that he had never before been aware of.  
 
 
Where I Come From
By Rick Bragg
 
Bragg is  prize winning columnist and humorist who specializes in the stories about his home area, the South.  This is a collection of columns from Southern Living magazine and Garden and Gun, filled with love and humor.
 
 
Wicked Hour: A Natalie Lockhart Novel
By Alice Blanchard
 
This is the second in a series introducing detective Natalie Lockhart, who was introduced in the book “Trace of Evil.”  Natalie has to find the murderer of a young musician, whose body was found in a trash can during her small town’s celebration of Halloween.  As she digs to find the killer, she discovers that this case may be related to the disappearance of her best friend years ago.  This is a good way to meet a new detective in what promises to be another good detective series.

Book Lovers Recommendations December 2020

Recommendations by Sue Lipstein
 
Ex Libris By Michiko Kakutani
Girl in the Mirror By Rose Carlyle
Lady
Miss Benson
Murder in Old Bombay By Nev March
No Time Like the Future By Michael J. Fox
One Night Two Souls Went Walking By Ellen Cooney
We Keep the Dead Close: a Murder in Harvard and a Half Century of Silence By Becky Cooper
Witch Hunter By Max Seeck
Woman Who Stole Vermeer: the True Story of Rose Dugdale and the Russborough House Art Heist By Anthony M. Amore
 
Ex Libris
By Michiko Kakutani
 
This is your holiday gift to someone special-or yourself.  It is an annotated  list of 100 books from all genres suggested by a former book editor of the New York Times.  Favorite classics, fiction, non-fiction, memoirs-new and old. Find your next read or plan your next year’s book challenge.
 
 
Girl in the Mirror
By Rose Carlyle
 
Trouble ensues when the inheritance of a fortune depends on which sibling in a family can get pregnant first-and that is made all the more complicated when twin sisters have to compete with each other.  What happens if one of them achieves pregnancy and the other does not?  A suspense and psychological thriller.
 
 
Lady’s Guide to Mischief and Mayhem
By Manda Collins
 
It is England in 1865 and Lady Katherin, who has become a notorious newspaper columnist, wants to try and solve a murder she has witnessed, only to be thwarted by a real Detective Inspector, who does not want the help of a woman.  She is smart and beautiful; he is handsome and competent.  So will they catch a killer? or each other? or both?
 
 
Miss Benson’s Beetle
By Rachel Joyce
 
A sensible schoolmarm spinster decides to abandon everything and travel with a friend to go on her dream mission-finding the golden beetle of New Caledonia, which may or may not exist.  The journey is not just to New Caledonia, but it is a journey inside our heroine, as she changes her life.
 
 
Murder in Old Bombay
By Nev March
 
An award winning debut mystery.  Two women have fallen to their deaths from the university’s clock tower, and the widower of one does not believe that his wife or her sister have committed suicide.  So he hires a British captain to investigate.  It’s a good chance to learn about old Bombay and enjoy a new writer.
 
 
No Time Like the Future
By Michael J. Fox
 
Well loved Michael J. Fox continues the saga of his life, discussing his decades long struggle with Parkinson’s disease, and his fight to maintain optimism in the face of a disease that will slowly rob him of his movement and his life.  He is realistic about his prognosis but uses what he has-family, a purpose, to keep him going, even though so much of his life has been robbed by this disease.
 
 
One Night Two Souls Went Walking
By Ellen Cooney
 
The moving fictional account of a young hospital chaplain who has to spend so much time ministering to patients in the busy medical center where she works that she has had no time to minister to herself.  We watch her with her patients as she works over the course of one night, and how what she learns from her work can slowly be used to heal herself.  
 
 
We Keep the Dead Close: a Murder in Harvard and a Half Century of Silence
By Becky Cooper
 
Non-fiction that reads like a novel.  As an undergrad at Harvard, Becky Cooper had heard the story of a female graduate student who was murdered in 1969.  Although everyone believed that she had been killed by a professor she was having an affair with, the murder was never solved.  Cooper spends 10 years finding the truth.  She uncovers  a lot about the culture of the time in academia, finds out a few secrets and brings some closure to the life of a woman who died too soon.
 
 
Witch Hunter
By Max Seeck
 
A new Scandanavian mystery writer!  Female investigator Jessica starts investigating a gruesome murder of the wife of a best sellling author.  At first she thinks the murderer is recreating  scenes from the author’s novel, but she soon finds it is even worse than that.  
 
 
Woman Who Stole Vermeer: the True Story of Rose Dugdale and the Russborough House Art Heist
By Anthony M. Amore
The true story of an heiress who pulled off art heists to help fund her political causes.  This fascinating story combines crime, art, politics and history while revealing a complicated, unique woman.

Book Lovers Recommendations November 2020 Part II

Recommendations by Sue Lipstein
 
Daddy By Emma Cline
Eli
End of the Day By Bill Clegg
If I Had Your Face By Frances Cha
Island Child By Molly Aitken
Kingdom By Jo Nesbo
Little Scratch By Rebecca Watson
Night Swim By Megan Goldin
Tsarina By Ellen Alpsten
Woman in the Mirror By Rebecca James
 
Daddy
By Emma Cline
 
Ten stories about ordinary people living what first appears to be very ordinary lives, but then the stories take a switch.  The author wants us to think about what lies beneath the surface of regular people.
 
 
Eli’s Promise
By Ronald Balson
 
This novel spans the course of 25 years, following the life of Eli Rosen and his quest for justice. The novel goes from Nazi occupied Poland to postwar Germany to Chicago during the Vietnam War era.
 
 
End of the Day
By Bill Clegg
 
Several seemingly disconnected stories all come together as Clegg intertwines the lives of multiple characters and then his story reveals their secrets going back fifty years.
 
 
If I Had Your Face
By Frances Cha
 
This debut novel is set in present day Seoul and tells the story of four young women in Korea,  each with different goals and each struggling to achieve them.  Their problems are both unique to life in South Korea, but also relate to the universal problems of all women.
 
 
Island Child
By Molly Aitken
 
The story of Oona is told in this debut novel.  Oona grew up on the island of Inis, a desolate island off the coast of Ireland where life had not changed in years.  Oona dreams of leaving the island, but then, she is forced to flee.  Twenty years later, she is forced to return to try to resolve the problems of her past so she can move on in her life.
 
 
Kingdom
By Jo Nesbo
 
Mechanic Roy is leading a simple life, when his brother, Carl, comes back to their little village with grand plans to build a hotel.  Roy, who has always protected Carl, finds it harder to do now that Carl and his plans have become problematic for him and the town.  It doesn’t help that the town authorities have suddenly started looking into the tragic deaths of their parents that happened years before.
 
 
Little Scratch
By Rebecca Watson
 
This novel is written in a totally unique stream of consciousness form.  The  novel follows the every thought of a woman for twenty four hours.  The unnamed woman tries to go about her usual, boring day although she has recently been the victim of a sexual assault.  Her chaotic thoughts make this a challenging novel to say the least.
 
 
Night Swim
By Megan Goldin
 
Rachel Krall is the host of a very successful true crime podcast.  Now she is anonymously asked to investigate a crime in a small town.  Rachel’s attempts to investigate this crime start to lead to a connection to a mystery from Rachel’s past-the disappearance of her sister 25 years ago.
 
Tsarina
By Ellen Alpsten
 
Peter the Great is dying-and his second wife, Catherine, wants to take over his power,  She has to do a lot of plotting, which includes keeping his death secret until she is ready to make her move.  She actually ruled as empress from Peter’s death until her own.
 
 
Woman in the Mirror
By Rebecca James
 
A modern Gothic novel.  In 1947, Alice Miller, a Londoner, accepts a post as governess at Winterbourne, where she is to look after the two children of the owner.  Although everything seems great at first, soon strange happenings start to threaten her sanity and her life.  The scene shifts to present day New York, when art gallery curator, Rachel, is informed that she is actually related to the owner of Winterbourne and is the only heir to the estate.  She excitedly goes to Winterbourne-and of course, problems and secrets emerge.

New Library Telephone System

We have made plans to replace our nearly 30-year old phone system with a new one this December (we are glad we got a system back then that lasted as long as it did!).  That installation will take place Monday, December 21 through Wednesday December 23, so there may be times of limited or no phone service with the Library on those dates.  Our building will be open and our staff will be able to answer email inquiries or requests.  For patrons needing curbside pick-up, simply park in one of the Library’s curbside parking spots and one of our staff will keep an eye out and come out to you!  We will have some of the library’s main phone numbers active as soon as possible, but please be patient with us as phone service may be limited. Thank you for your patience and have a happy holiday season!